50 Pictures From The Past That Will Give You The Chills

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Are you someone who is an avid fan of history? Well then, you should check out these 50 pictures from the past that will give you the chills. There are several events in the past that shaped the way we look at the world today. The number of photos taken in the past gives us insight into how people lived their lives and the tragic events that happened. 

These 50 pictures from the past are pretty interesting as each one has its own little story and will give you the chills once you find out more about each one. So if you are interested in learning more about these 50 pictures from the past that will give you the chills, then check out this gallery, as you will certainly learn something new about the past that you may not have known before. 

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Easy Company At Hitler's Eagle's Nest

Easy Company was the second battalion in the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment that was part of the 101st Airborne Division. Also known as the "Screaming Eagles," the U.S. infantry division is considered to be one of the most famous to have fought in the European theater in World War II. 

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Easy Company became even more popular when the book Band of Brothers was released in 1992, which inspired the HBO mini-series Band of Brothers. This picture was taken towards the end of World War II as Easy Company was assigned to occupy Berchtesgaden, which was home to Hitler's famous mountain getaway Eagle’s Nest, located in the Austrian Alps. 

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New York City Builders Taking A Break

This picture was taken during the 1930s when the Rockefeller Center was under construction and showed some construction workers enjoying their lunch break 850 feet above the ground. Back then, there weren't any safety harnesses to prevent construction workers from falling off skyscrapers, and you had to be someone who wasn't afraid of heights, as these heights would scare the common person away. 

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Men were scrambling to get a job during the 1930s as the Great Depression was in full swing. Luckily, the Rockefeller Center employed around 250,000 construction workers, but it wasn't an easy job by any stretch. 

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Elvis Presley In The Army 

Not too many people know that Elvis Presley joined the military before he became the "King of Rock." Presley joined the army in 1958 and served his country until 1964 when he was discharged from the Army Reserve. Presley was part of two different armor battalions and was even stationed in Germany for a couple of years. 

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Presley never saw action, as there had been no war during his time in the service, but he received advanced military training while he was stationed in Germany. Presley was still heavily into music and wrote a couple of songs while he was serving his country.  
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Lumberjacks Cutting Down A Sequoia Tree

This picture from the past shows two lumberjacks cutting down a Sequoia tree located in the Pacific Northwest in 1915. Sequoia trees are also known as Redwood trees and are the tallest trees in the world as you can see from the size of the tree trunk in this picture. It would take several hours or even days to cut down just one of these giant trees. 

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Being a lumberjack is pretty dangerous today, but it was even more frightening to be one back in the day, as people didn't think that much about safety. It is illegal to cut down these trees today, but back then, there was no limit to how many you could cut down. 

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Amiens Cathedral During World War I

This picture from the past shows the interior of Amiens Cathedral during World War I. When the first World War broke out, France was quite surprised by Germany when they started to bomb their cities as it was a new type of warfare that was invented at the time. France ended up losing several cathedrals and other historical monuments as the Germans were bombing anything that they could. 

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When the Germans pushed to the city of Amiens, the French tried to protect Amiens Cathedral as best as they could, so they lined the inside and outside of the historic cathedral with thousands of sandbags. Amazingly, this prevented any major damage from occurring to Amiens Cathedral. 

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American Men Looking For Work During The Great Depression 

This picture shows a long line of desperate men looking for work during the Great Depression in America. The Great Depression was an economic crisis that affected the whole world and left many people unemployed during a ten-year period. Almost every sector in the nation was affected by the Great Depression as trade income was cut by fifty percent and unemployment was up by twenty-three percent. 

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People all over the world were looking for any work they could get their hands on as money and food were scarce at the time, and even the rich were impacted by the Great Depression. 

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Juliane Koepcke, Survivor of A Plane Crash

This is a photo that might give you the chills as it is the first picture that was taken of Juliane Koepcke who survived a plane crash and eleven days in the Amazon rainforest. Koepcke was only seventeen years old at the time when she boarded LANSA Flight 508 which was flying over the Peruvian rainforest. 

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The plane ended up being struck by lightning, and portions of the plane were already disintegrating before it reached the ground. Amazingly, Koepcke was strapped in her seat and survived the 10,000-foot descent into the rainforest. Koepcke survived for eleven days before she was found by rescue parties and only suffered a broken collar bone. 

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U.S. Soldiers Storming The Beaches of Normandy

This picture from the past shows brave American soldiers storming the beaches of Normandy on D-Day. The Allied Invasion of Normandy was the largest seaborne invasion in history and was one of the reasons why the Allies won World War II. The Americans were not the only country that participated in the Normandy landings as there were several countries that worked together with the big ones being the United Kingdom, France, and Australia. 

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Around 10,000 Allied soldiers died during the Normandy landings, but the operation proved to be successful as the Allies gained control of France within a couple of months, and the end of the Third Reich was near. 

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East German Soldier Risking His Life To Rescue A Child During The Cold War

This picture from the past shows an East German soldier risking his life to help a little boy cross over the newly built Berlin Wall as the little boy was separated from his parents. The Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961 and encircled West Berlin. Once the wall was in place no one was allowed to cross over to the other side. 

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It is said that the East German soldier ended up helping the little boy get across, but he ended up getting reported to his superiors, who removed him from his unit. It is unsure what happened to the soldier, but in the end, he did the right thing. 

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The Destruction of the Hindenburg

The destruction of the Hindenburg was one of the most tragic aviation disasters to happen during the 1930s and is one of the main reasons why hydrogen-filled rigid airships were abandoned. The Hindenburg was the longest and largest airship in the world and was the pride and joy of Nazi Germany.  

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Unfortunately, on May 6, 1937, while attempting to land in New Jersey, the Hindenburg caught fire and exploded in front of a greeting group of on-lookers. Out of the 97 passengers and crewmen, 62 people survived the disaster. This marked the end of the Hindenburg class airships as the disaster proved that hydrogen-filled airships were too dangerous. 

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One of the Last Photos of the Titanic 

This is one of the last pictures of the Titanic before it crossed the Atlantic Ocean and met its end. The RMS Titanic was the largest passenger ship at the time and was built in Liverpool. The Titanic is one of the most famous ships in history as the sinking of the Titanic was the deadliest sinking of a single ship. 

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More than 1,500 people perished when the Titanic sank after it struck an iceberg in the Atlantic Ocean. The Titanic was said to be too big to sink, but this wasn't the case for this passenger ship. 

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Howard Hughes Controlling An Airplane Remotely

This picture from the past shows Howard Hughes controlling his RC airplane from a remote controller. Howard Hughes was a man of many traits as he was a successful businessman, pilot, engineer, film producer, and philanthropist. Hughes was most known for his inventions in aviation and was the pioneer for many things that we use in aviation today. 

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Hughes believed that anything was possible, which was one reason why he was ahead of his time. Sadly, Hughes had a bad case of OCD that affected his daily life and his whole career. The aviation world might have been different if Hughes was around for a bit longer. 

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A Female Lockheed Martin Employee Working On An Aircraft

This picture from the past shows a female Lockheed Martin employee riveting an aircraft. Lockheed Martin was one of the first aviation companies to employ females in the early 1940s. Although aviation jobs were mostly done by men, women started to join the force as power tools helped women perform on the same level as men. 

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Once Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese, America was looking to hire more women to manufacture planes as all the men were needed on the front lines. Rosie the Riveter was created around the same time as it helped to promote females working in aviation factories. 

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The Rat Pack On the Las Vegas Strip

This picture shows the famous Rat Pack in front of the Sandals casino sign in Las Vegas. The Rat Pack consisted of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop, and Peter Lawford. There were a couple of members of the group who were known to party with the Rat Pack, such as Humphrey Bogart and even Lauren Bacall. 

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The Rat Pack was always partying together in Las Vegas and were some of the best performers in the city. The Rat Pack appeared in several films together, with a few of the most popular being Ocean's 11It Happened in Brooklyn, and Marriage on the Rocks

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Marines Raising The American Flag On Iwo Jima 

On February 23, 1945, this picture was taken of six marines raising the American flag during the Battle of Iwo Jima, which has become one of the most iconic photographs of the Pacific theater. The Battle of Iwo Jima was one of the bloodiest battles fought in the late stages of the Pacific War. 

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The flag was raised atop Mount Suribachi and signified that the Americans were close to winning the battle. This photograph was the first and only one to win the Pulitzer Prize for Photography the same year it became public. A memorial was sculpted in Arlington Ridge Park dedicated to the men who died during the Pacific War. 

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Mount St. Helen Eruption 

This picture from the past captures the moment Mount St. Helen erupted, which is located in Skamania County, Washington, and occurred in 1980. A number of volcanic explosions started at Mount St. Helen, which surprised everyone within the region as no one expected the volcano to erupt even though it was known to be active. 

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There were around 57 people killed and several hundred animals killed in the disaster. Hundreds of miles of forest were destroyed, along with several historical landmarks. The eruption cloud rose up to 80,000 feet and was a pretty impressive sight to see in person. Mount St. Helen is still active today, but it is closely monitored by the government. 

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King George VI Riding Down A Slide 

This photograph from the past shows King George VI, who was Duke of York at the time, enjoying himself by sliding down a newly built slide in 1925. This is a rare image of the royal, as you usually don't see him in this setting in his other photographs. 

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It looks like the Duke of York was not too impressed with the slide at the Wembley exhibition, but at least he was willing to give it a try. The British Empire Exhibition was a colonial expo that was held at Wembley Park in London, which was held from 1924 to 1925. 

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African American Artillerymen Preparing Easter Gifts For Hitler 

On Easter Sunday in 1945, Sergeant William E. Thomas and Private First Class Joseph Jackson were preparing some Easter gifts for Hitler and his troops. Soldiers have been writing messages on artillery shells since World War I, and it is still something that is done by soldiers today as it is a way to poke fun at the enemy. 

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Many African Americans participated in World War II and were mainly on the front lines toward the war's end. General Eisenhower even praised the African Americans for volunteering as they were full of spirit and were fighting against the Germans with great success. 

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Milkman Delivering Milk In War Torn London 

This photograph from the past shows a milkman during his daily route right after a German bombing raid on a street in London in 1940. This milkman is not deterred from working his job despite the bombs dropping overhead and depicted how strong the will of the British people was during the Blitz of London.

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The Germans bombed the city of London for nine months straight, and around 43,000 people were killed during the bombing raids, which mostly focused on denser parts of the city and industrial areas where weapons were being manufactured. Despite the constant fear of getting bombed, the British people still went on with their daily lives.

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Ojibwe Native American Spearfishing 

This photograph from the past captured an Ojibwe Native American spearfishing in what is now southern Canada. The Ojibwe tribe was known for being skilled fishermen and was famous for making birchwood canoes which were far superior to canoes other tribes were making. The Ojibwe tribe was also known for copper mining and making maple syrup. 

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The Ojibwe tribe traded with both the French and British and built a good relationship with the two as they would often trade food and furs. The Ojibwe tribe spent most of their time on the Great Lakes, which is one of the reasons why they were such skilled fishermen. 

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David Isom Crossing The Segregation Line 

On June 8, 1958, David Isom decided to cross over the segregation line that was present at an indoor pool in Florida. Isom was only nineteen years old at the time when he crossed the color line and swam in the section where only whites were allowed. 

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Isom's actions resulted in the indoor pool being closed down as it was instructed by the city manager. This was yet another example of segregation that was brought to the public's eye thanks to David Isom. The indoor pool was later reopened but under the terms that the pool was not to be segregated. 

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Nuclear Bomb Tests In Nevada

This photo from the past captures the moment a nuclear bomb exploded in the deserts of Nevada. The Nevada Test Site was just located about 65 miles southeast of the city of Las Vegas, which was created in 1951 and used to test nuclear bombs. The government first dropped a 1-kiloton-of-TNT to test if the site was suitable for nuclear bombs. 

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The United States government dropped over 1,000 nuclear bombs on this site. These nuclear explosions could be seen for miles and could even be seen by residents of Las Vegas. The site is still active today but has long since stopped the testing of nuclear bombs. 

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Filming of the Original MGM Logo

This photograph from the past shows the filming of the original MGM logo, which was captured in 1917. Leo the Lion was the name of the real lion used to film the iconic logo that was used by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio. The idea of the logo was thought of by Paramount Studios' art director Lionel S. Reiss, who made one of the most iconic film studio logos. 

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Several lions were used over the years to update the MGM logo, but now the studio uses a CGI version of Leo the Lion as a way to pay homage to him. 

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Nikola Tesla In His Lab

This photograph from 1899 shows Nikola Tesla in his Colorado Springs laboratory while his magnifying transmitter was on. The magnifying transmitter produced an insane amount of high-voltage energy and was one of the many inventions that Tesla created during his life. 

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Tesla was researching wireless transmission of electrical power as he found that it would be much easier to transfer electricity wirelessly. Telsa was famously known for inventing alternating currents and how to transmit and generate AC power. Tesla was a futurist and predicted that humans would someday create the internet. Tesla was ahead of his time, and things might have been different if the government had invested in his projects more. 

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Acrobats Performing On Top of the Empire State Building 

On August 21, 1934, the amazing "Three Jacksons," Jarley Smith, Jewell Waddek, and Jimmy Kerrigan, performed acrobatics on top of the Empire State Building. The three were performing some of the most difficult acrobatic moves one thousand feet above the ground, and there were no safety nets to catch them if they fell. 

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These three were definitely not afraid of heights, as they wouldn't have been able to pull off their moves so easily. The Three Jacksons gained a large majority of their fame from this photograph, which became the most iconic acrobatic photograph in the world. 

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Statue Of Liberty Under Construction In Paris

This photograph shows the Statue of Liberty under construction in Paris before it was shipped to the United States. The Statue of Liberty was designed by French sculptor and painter Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, which he named the Liberty Enlightening the World. The Statue of Liberty was completed in 1884, and two years later, was dismantled into 350 pieces. 

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The pieces of the Statue of Liberty were then shipped to New York as it was a gift to the United States from the people of France. It only took four months to refit the pieces, and the statue was placed on the pedestal that it now stands on today on Liberty Island. 

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Remains of Vladimir Komarov

This photograph was captured in 1967 and shows the remains of Vladimir Komarov, the first man to die in a space flight. Komarov was a dedicated Soviet test pilot that participated in a couple of spaceflights during the early years of the Soviet space program. Although Komarov was medically unfit for spaceflight, he went up to space twice.

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Komarov's first spaceflight was successful, but his second proved to be his last as his spacecraft, the Soyuz 1, ended up having a catastrophic failure during reentry into Earth's atmosphere. Komarov's spacecraft never deployed its parachute, which resulted in him crashing into the ground, and this is what remained of him once the Soviets arrived at the crash site. 

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Workers Painting the Eiffel Tower

This picture from 1910 shows a couple of workers painting the Eiffel Tower at an extreme height with no safety harnesses. People back in the day were made of something else, as they had no fear when it came to heights and working in extreme conditions. 

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The Eiffel Tower has been painted in several colors over the years, with the first being red. During this time period, the Eiffel Tower was painted in a gold color and was updated every now and again. It must have taken a long time to paint the whole Eiffel Tower as it is one massive structure. 

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Construction of Mount Rushmore

The photograph from 1939 shows the construction of Mount Rushmore, which began in 1927. It took fourteen years for the construction of Mount Rushmore to be completed. Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor of the national memorial, decided to choose George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, and Theodore Roosevelt to be carved into the mountain. 

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Borglum planned to carve out the four famous American men's waists, but time constraints and money hindered the project, which only allowed them to sculpt the heads. Borglum wanted to carve more sculptures into the mountain, but funding and hard granite deposits stopped him from doing so. 

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Marilyn Monroe On the Set of The Seven Year Itch

This photograph from the past shows Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch, which was one of the most popular films in which she starred in. Marilyn rose to fame during the 1950s and 1960s as she was a popular singer, actress, and model that would turn heads everywhere she went. Monroe starred in a number of films, such as As Young as You Feel, Monkey Business, Clash by Night, and Don't Bother to Knock

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Monroe was ranked the sixth greatest female legend from the Golden Age of Hollywood but never received an Academy Award for her acting performances. 

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Construction of the Hoover Dam

This photograph shows the construction of the Hoover Dam, which started in 1931. This was one of the largest construction projects going on at the time as the Great Depression had just started, but despite the economic setback, the builders were able to finish the construction of the Hoover Dam in 1936. 

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Hoover Dam was constructed to help control the flooding of the Colorado River, produce a large amount of energy, and was the reason why more people started to move out to the west. The Hoover Dam cost around $713 million in today's money and took many lives during its construction. 

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The Sinking of A German U-Boat

This rare photograph from the past shows the moment that the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Spencer destroyed the German U-boat, U-175. It wasn't easy to destroy a German U-boat as they were not easy to find and they could easily maneuver out of danger's way. 

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Once a German U-boat was found, multiple ships would coordinate with each other to force the U-boat deep underwater. This allowed Allied ships to use depth charges to destroy the German U-boat once they found it with underwater sonar. Although the task seemed impossible, many Allied ships successfully destroyed these U-boats, especially towards the war's end. 

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Graffiti In The Reichstag

This photograph from 1945 shows the massive amount of graffiti that was left by the Soviets once they took control of the Reichstag. The Russians planted the Soviet flag on top of the Reichstag in May 1945, which marked the end of World War II in Europe. Since Germany had pushed deep into Russia and killed millions of its civilians and troops, the Russians had a deep resentment for the Germans which led them to graffiti the Reichstag as it was the capital building of Germany. 

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Some of the graffiti left by Russian soldiers is still present in the Reichstag today and is a stark reminder of the dark past that Germany was once in. 

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Bulletproof Vest Being Tested In Washington D.C.

This picture from 1923 shows two men testing out the bulletproof vests they invented, and presented, to officials in Washington, D.C. The first bulletproof vest was invented in 1561 by Filippo Negroli, an Italian master armorer that made armor strong enough to withstand gunfire. 

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Since then, several inventors have come up with different variants of bulletproof vests, with each getting better with time. Now certain bulletproof vests can stop powerful rounds, and this is something that militaries all over the world have heavily invested in. 

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Racetrack On Top of The Fiat Factory

This photograph from the past shows the racetrack that was built on top of the Fiat factory. The factory and racetrack were designed by Italian engineer Giacomo Mattè-Trucco. The factory started being constructed in 1916 and was completed in 1923. This was the first building of this magnitude made out of reinforced concrete. 

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The Fiat factory had a unique assembly line, as each floor was reserved for a certain stage of the assembly. Once a stage of the assembly was completed, the car would move up one floor to the next stage until it reached the top floor for test driving. 

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Niagara Falls In The Winter of 1911

This rare historical photo might give you the chills as it shows Niagara Falls during the winter of 1911, which was completely frozen over. The harsh winter of 1911 created a thick sheet of ice that created the amazing snowscape that you see in this photograph. Although the falls were frozen over, the Niagara River was still flowing below fifty feet of ice. 

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The ice lasted until early 1912 and was used to cross over the Niagara River until there was a major accident which was caused by ice melting. Who knows if this will ever happen again, as this would be a sight to see. 

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Helen Keller Meeting Charlie Chaplin 

This photograph from the past shows Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin for the first time. The two met in 1919 at Chaplin's Hollywood Studios on the set of Sunnyside. Although Keller was both deaf and blind, she still wanted to meet the man who was the world's most famous actor. 

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Keller and Chaplin spent a lot of time together and became good friends over the years. Chaplin would even ask Keller to look over some of his movie scripts to see if they were appealing to her. Keller even wrote in her autobiography that she enjoyed the time that she spent with the famous Charlie Chaplin. 

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Captain Kahn And The Great Manta

This photo from 1933 shows Captain Kahn with the Great Manta that he caught while out fishing off the coast of New Jersey. Kahn was a rich man from New York City that loved to fish with his buddies. When Captian Kahn and a couple of his friends decided to go fishing on a hot August day, they didn't predict what was going to happen to them next. 

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The men started fishing in deep waters when something became tangled with the ship's anchor line. Kahn and his buddies realized that it was a huge manta ray and contacted a local Coast Guard ship to help deal with the monster, as it could capsize his boat. The Coast Guard shot the sea creature 22 times before it was killed. It weighed an impressive 5,000 pounds. 

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Terra Nova Expedition of 1911

This photograph from the past shows two men from the Terra Nova Expedition of 1911 standing in front of an ice grotto. The Terra Nova Expedition was led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott, who was accompanied by 64 other men, which consisted of mostly skilled scientists and sailors. 

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The objective of the Terra Nova Expedition was to carry out research in Antarctica and explore regions that were not explored before. The expedition lasted three years, and Scott and four other members of his group reached the pole on January 17, 1912. Scott ended up perishing along with the four other companions as they had become lost. 

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Woodstock 1969

This photo from 1969 shows an aerial view of the music festival Woodstock. Woodstock Music and Art Fair was held from August 15th through the 18th on a dairy farm in Bethel, New York. Around 400,000 people attended the three-day music festival, which featured some of the most popular musicians at the time, such as Richie Havens, Santana, Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Jefferson Airplane, The Who, and several more legendary musicians. 

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Michael Lang was the man behind Woodstock and with the help of a couple of friends, he created one of the most legendary music festivals in history.  

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Hiroshima Shadow

This photograph from the past shows the shadow of a Hiroshima resident seated on the Sumitomo bank steps. This resident was enjoying another day in Hiroshima and had no idea that an atomic bomb was about to go off several hundred feet away. The victim was walking with a cane on the steps and was incinerated within seconds, which left a shadow of where they once stood. 

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There are several shadows that were located all over Hiroshima and have become known as Hiroshima shadows. Several of these sections of the city were removed and stored in the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum. 

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The Sphinx Before Excavation 

This photograph was taken in the late 1800s from a hot air balloon looking down on the Sphinx before it was excavated. The Sphinx was first excavated by Giovanni Battista Caviglia in 1887. Still, it wasn't until the 1930s that the Egyptian government decided to repair the head of the Sphinx and the rest of the body. 

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When the Sphinx was first discovered by modern scholars, it was buried in the sand all the way to it its neck. It took several years before the Sphinx started looking like what it does today, and there are still secrets that it holds. 

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Montparnasse Derailment

This photograph from 1895 shows the Granville to Paris Express train after it derailed from its tracks at the Gare Montparnasse in Paris. The accident was caused by the train driver, who realized the train was behind schedule and decided to accelerate to make up time. 

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When the train reached the station, the train was going too fast, and when the driver tried to apply the brakes, they didn't work, resulting in the train smashing through the train station wall and crashing into the street. The accident only killed one woman on the street below, and six people were injured. The train driver went to prison for two months and paid a fine. 

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Pearl Harbor Under Attack

This photograph was taken on December 7, 1941, by a Japanese pilot during the attack on Pearl Harbor. This was the beginning of the surprise attack that resulted in over 2,300 deaths and several American naval ships being destroyed. This marked the beginning of the Americans joining World War II on both fronts and the main reason the American public wanted to go to war. 

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There were only 64 Japanese pilots that were killed during the attack on Pearl Harbor, which ended up being a successful attack on their end, but they would soon find out that they had just awoken a sleeping giant. 

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Southern Pacific Railroad

This photograph from the past shows a locomotive train on the Southern Pacific Railroad plowing through snow-covered tracks in 1949. The Southern Pacific Railroad started being constructed in 1865 and was one of the main ways to get supplies out to the west. 

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The Southern Pacific Railroad company was in charge of managing all the rail systems in the west of the United States, mostly located in California. The railroad system transformed America and helped it expand into the world's biggest superpower. Some of the same railroad systems are still being used today but have been updated over the years to accommodate newer train systems. 

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Punt Gun

This photograph from the early 1900s shows two men carrying a punt gun which was actually used to shoot birds. The punt gun is a huge shotgun that was used to shoot down waterfowl in large numbers. These guns were not intended to be held by one person but would often be mounted onto a boat. 

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Photo Courtesy: [WorldNewsMedia/Imgur]
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Once the United States got rid of its waterfowl problem, punt guns were banned as they were considered to be a cruel way to shoot down birds, although this didn't stop people from using them afterward. The punt gun must have been pretty scary to shoot for the first time as the size is intimidating. 

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The Most Beautiful Suicide 

This historical photo that was captured on May 1, 1947, shows what many call the "most beautiful suicide." Evelyn McHale was the name of the beautiful lady that jumped to her death from the 86th floor of the Empire State Building. The picture was taken about four minutes after McHale jumped to her death by photographer Robert Wiles. 

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Photo Courtesy: [EmpericalStatesofAmerica/Imgur]
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Everyone who witnessed the death of McHale was quite surprised to find that her body was still intact despite her dropping around 1,000 feet onto a parked car which is the reason why her suicide was labeled the most beautiful in history.  

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Navigation Hotline In 1963

This picture from 1963 shows a navigation hotline in London. Back then, there was no such thing as the internet or GPS devices, so people would have to contact these navigation hotlines if they found that they were lost. Navigation hotlines were used worldwide as it wasn't easy getting around with just paper maps. 

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Photo Courtesy: [Iwokeupdeadthismorning/Imgur]
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Back then, you either would have to right down rigorous directions to get where you wanted to go or you just had to know your way around the city. Luckily, we don't have to worry about contacting a navigation hotline as all you need is your cell phone nowadays. 

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Giant Pile of Bison Skulls

This photograph was taken in 1870 and shows a massive pile of bison skulls ready to be ground up and made into fertilizer. Sadly, bison were nearly extinct when the settlers came west, as they killed over 50 million out of the 60 million. By 1886, only a couple of small herds of bison were located on the Great Plains. 

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Photo Courtesy: [Stealthy/Imgur]
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The killing of so many bison was devasting for the Native Americans in the region as they had hunted and relied on the massive beasts that roamed the Great Plains. The Great Plains might have looked a lot different if the settlers didn't kill off a majority of them. 

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