This Amish Teacher Got A Makeover - And Her Modest Appearance Was Totally Transformed

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Photo Courtesy: [SNEJANA FARBEROV/MAILONLINE]

If you are an Amish woman, it is frowned upon to worry about your appearance or spend time on how you look. Sarah, an Amish housekeeper and teacher, got the opportunity for a makeover, and she took it. She was completely transformed and loved what she saw. Rules for Amish women may seem old-fashioned to outsiders, but it is their way of life. The Amish live much simpler lives.

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Housekeeper And Teacher Sarah

Sarah, an Amish housekeeper and teacher, was twenty-one years old when she was offered the chance of a makeover. Sarah grew up in a small town in an Amish community, which meant that she had to follow strict rules. Sarah was very plain and of course, she wasn't using any flat irons on her hair. 

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She was modestly dressed, had no makeup, and covered her hair in a bonnet. She had neglected her hair most of her life, never having colored or cut her hair. That is until she was visited by Glamour magazine's hairstylist, Theodore Leaf.

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Theodore Leaf

Theodore Leaf had his own Los Angeles salon and his own business, where he did hair for editorial shoots and the runway. He made a big splash in the world of entertainment as the youngest contestant on Bravo's Shear Genius. 

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His experience on the show helped him develop a role as on-camera talent and beauty editor-at-large for Glamour magazine. Leaf assisted in Sarah's makeover.

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The Amish Live Their Lives According To The Ordnung, Or "Order"

The Amish live by the Ordnung, which is a manual that governs all facets of Amish society, and it exists only in the minds of those who subscribe to its practices. The unspoken rules outline every rule of Amish life, including how to dress, their carriage design, hairstyles, and how they behave. 

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Violating these rules can result in a member being shunned. The rules are not written on any document, but the Amish have relied on oral tradition to keep their unspoken rules alive.

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Bad Hair Day Team

Glamour magazine was first published in April 1939 as a traditional hard-copy magazine. When it was first published, it was called Glamour of Hollywood and included "Bad Hair Day" news, helpful articles, tips, and tricks. 

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Glamour is run today by Conde' Nast Publications and is a women's magazine. Theodore Leaf is the host of "Bad Hair Day," and they are involved in many makeovers, which are featured in Glamour.

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Rumspringa

Rumspringa is one of the Amish religion's most known and fascinating beliefs. When Amish turn sixteen years old, they are allowed to experience everything about the outside world. They have to decide then whether they still desire to live in the Amish community or not. 

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Their parents encourage the teens to behave morally, but they are allowed to break the rules and experience modern clothes, drinking, drugs, and more. Most experiences are relatively mild, and roughly ninety percent of Amish teens eventually commit fully to their faith.

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The Makeover Is A Special Treat

The "Bad Hair Day" team surprised Sarah in her kitchen, where she was wearing a modest brown dress. She typically just performs chores around the house and always has her hair tucked up under her traditional Amish cap.

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"The cap thing, you always just wear the cap, and your hair is just flipped up in a barrette. It's an act of modesty." ----- Sarah. Sarah was approaching the end of Rumspringa and was, therefore, allowed to have the makeover.

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Sarah Sees Herself For The First Time

Theodore Leaf did Sarah's makeover and added layers to frame her face. He wanted to create volume but keep things practical. He didn't cut too much so that Sarah would still be able to wear the bonnet. 

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He also told her how to keep her hair looking good even without special equipment. When Sarah saw herself for the first time, she was astonished. She was at a loss for words and was visibly ecstatic with her makeover.

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The Amish Have A Lot Of Children

The Amish have always been inspired by the Bible's call to "be fruitful and multiply." Most Amish families average six or seven children. 

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However, there is a limited gene pool because most Amish and Mennonite people are descendants of the original two hundred families that first settled in America. Because of the limited gene pool, recessive genes linked to birth defects are frequently present in both parents of a given family.

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They Are Never Baptized Before Adulthood

The Amish believe that baptism should be an individual choice because it is a lifelong commitment. As a result, members of the Amish community are not baptized before the age of sixteen. 

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In addition, they usually don't make their decision until they are between the ages of eighteen and twenty-two. They usually experience Rumspringa first and then decide if they want to fully commit to the Amish religion.

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Members Can Be Excommunicated

The Amish have very little tolerance for the disrespect of their rules among their members. Members are expected to fully adhere to the rules of the Ordnung, and if they fail to do so, they risk excommunication. 

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When a member is excommunicated, the rest of the community can no longer eat, sleep, or accept gifts from the individual. The member is always welcomed back into the group if they genuinely repent for their actions.

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Non-Violence Is A Significant Pillar Of Amish Beliefs

The Amish shun all forms of violence and any individual that is involved in violence. As a result, they refuse to serve in the military or pursue any government or police jobs. 

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Their beliefs also prevent them from involving themselves in the court system in any capacity. The Amish view litigation as a means of violence and aggression.

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Church Takes Place In The Home

Most Christians hold church services in a church, but the Amish hold religious services in their homes. Members of Amish communities are divided geographically, with every family in a region hosting a church service at their home as part of a rotation. The services can last up to three hours, and the men and women sit separately. 

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The pastor usually moves between rooms to preach to people seated in different rooms of the home. It is held every Sunday with lunch and time for socializing afterward. In addition, the pastor has no formal training and is drawn from nominations by the congregation.

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Faceless Dolls Protect Children From Vanity

Amish children often have faceless dolls that lack distinguishing features like faces, hair, fingers, and toes. The faceless dolls promote uniformity and prevent one doll from looking better than another. 

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“Authentic Amish dolls do not have a face on them. Some use buttons for eyes and put a face on, but doll collectors wouldn’t purchase them if they had faces because they know our tradition is 'Thou shall make no graven image.' So, therefore, we don’t take pictures, and no collector would take a doll for a collection if it had a face.” ----- Kathryn Lengacher, Doll Maker.

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The Amish Don't Evangelize

Unlike most other religions, most Amish don’t make any efforts to boost membership in their religion. They actually prefer to stay in a closed society and focus on improving life in the community. 

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They do not actively recruit, and actually, their rigid lifestyle makes joining relatively prohibitive. However, they don’t deny those who wish to join their ranks, but most don’t want to learn Pennsylvania Dutch.

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Schooling Stops At Eighth Grade

In the Amish community, schooling ends after the eighth grade. They see little practical value in formal schooling beyond that grade, and studying abstract subjects is seen as secondary to the essential skills of reading, writing, and arithmetic. After the children graduate eighth grade, they receive vocational training in agriculture, craftsmanship, or another profession held by a member of the community. They also oppose higher learning because of its potential to foster anti-Christian ideas.

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Don Kraybill stated, "The fact that they terminate at the end of the 8th grade also means that they don't have seminaries or formal theological training for lay people or pastors. Their view of the world and their practices are driven by tradition. They do respect the wisdom of older people. Most rules and regulations that guide daily life are not written down, so they are passed along by oral tradition, and that privileges the elderly and those in charge. They're the ones who remember and pass along the traditions. There's also a profound respect for God's work in the world and a strong belief that the world in mysterious. There's a belief in a very active devil and in angels. In many ways, this is a pre-scientific worldview."

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They Have No Private Access To Electricity Or Technology

The majority of Amish people reject the use of electricity in their homes. They focus on the community rather than the individual and believe that if people have the ability to complete a task alone, it prevents the community from bonding. 

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However, they use technology when necessary, such as a public phone used by everyone. They also have a computer explicitly marketed to them, which is used for business transactions but has no video, music, or internet capabilities.

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Women Are Expected To Be Subservient

The Amish have conservative, biblically motivated views and specific expectations regarding how women should behave within their society. In the home, husbands and wives can create whatever power dynamic best serves their household. 

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However, in public, a wife is always expected to defer to her husband in order to maintain an image of subservience. Traditionally, a woman’s role is as a wife and mother who maintains the home.

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Amish Teens Become Intimate Yet Remain Chaste Through Bundling

Amish teens do become intimate, but they remain chaste through bundling, which is a method for developing intimacy while removing physical temptation. 

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It often consists of a young couple lying side by side in bed while wrapped in extra blankets and talking through most of the night. Bundling has roots in the Bible but is relatively uncommon in the twenty-first century.

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Photographs Are Looked Down Upon As "Graven Images"

The Amish communities often open up to tourists for financial gain, but they usually prohibit photographs from being taken. The Amish look down on the photography and believe in the biblical notions of humility and idol worship. 

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They make a distinction between naturalistic candidly within their environment and posed photographs. Amish don’t approve of posed images and even get their government identification cards without a picture.

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They Prefer Plain, Sensible Clothing

Amish clothing is usually plain, boldly advertising their traditions, identities, and values. They prefer their clothing to be simple, standard, and practical. Men’s clothing does not include pockets, zippers, or belts. They also reject collars and must always have on either a straw hat or a formal black felt hat. 

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Women usually only have four dresses: one to wash, one to wear, one for dress, and one for spare. They are long and patternless, and to church, they wear a white apron and cape if single and a black apron and cape if married.

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Beards Reveal The Wearer's Relationship Status

The Amish maintain certain expectations regarding men’s facial hair. Men are clean-shaven until they are married, at which point they begin growing beards. They do continue to shave their upper lips because mustaches are perceived to bear ties to the military. 

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An Amish man’s beard is a particularly personal staple of the Amish faith. In fact, beard-cutting attacks are considered religious hate crimes and are punishable with prison time.

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Women Rarely Receive A Higher Education

Amish men sometimes receive further education after eighth grade. They often learn agricultural practices on a farm and how to become an apprentice at a shop. They learn a trade in order to provide for their families. 

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However, women rarely receive higher education. Some become teachers but have to quit once married. Once school ends, Amish women concentrate on domestic matters.

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They Must Cover Up With A Bonnet

The cloth worn on an Amish woman’s head is required and is actually a “prayer covering.” The plain color and fabric are to show modesty and humility. 

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When they go outside, they usually wear a bonnet on top of their covering. Anything that can generate pride or be considered too unusual is still prohibited. Outsiders often call the covering a bonnet.

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They Aren't Supposed To Cut Their Hair

Amish women often go their entire lives without getting a haircut because the Bible deems it a shame. The woman will grow her hair long and put it in a bun under the prayer covering on her head.

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It is also prohibited for women to style or color their hair as it individualizes them. It is the same reason why men are not permitted to trim their beards after marriage.

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Their Wedding Dresses Aren't White

In most of the world, white wedding dresses are very popular, but that is not the case when it comes to Amish culture. The Amish women often prefer to wear hues of blue and indigo for their weddings. 

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In addition, they usually make their own dresses, which are plainly designed and end at the calf. The bridesmaid's dresses are known as “newehockers.” The wedding dress is often worn again, usually for church. Many Amish women also are buried in their wedding dresses.

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They Rarely, If Ever, Wear Makeup

The Amish are very plain people, and the term "pride" serves as a point of pride. As a result, Amish women rarely wear makeup. Sometimes during Rumspringa, teens will experiment with makeup. 

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There are very few Amish women that have reported discreetly wearing light makeup. They feel the makeup draws attention to them, and they value their inner beauty.

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They Are Highly Unlikely To Work Outside The Home

In the Amish community, gender roles are clearly defined. The husband is expected to work and make money to support his family, and the wife runs the household and is a mother and wife. 

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However, it is not entirely unheard of for an Amish woman to sometimes run her own business. It is very rare, though, and a wife almost never operates a business if her children are particularly young.

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They Can't Become Preachers Or Other Church Officials

Another rule in the Amish community is that Amish women cannot become preachers or other church officials. The Amish follow the teachings of the Bible, so precisely that women's roles remain very clearly defined in relation to men. 

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An Amish tour guide, Lester Beachy, stated, "In the eyes of God, both male and female have the same value. It is simply that we have different roles to fulfill."

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They Do Not Wear Buttons In Most Communities

Amish clothing is plain, with the fabric of men's shirts and women's dresses often in pleasing shades of purple, blue, green, brown, or black. However, it is rare for men's clothing to include buttons, as most believe that buttons are too decorative and gaudy. 

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Several Amish feel that buttons are a luxury item and can lead to vanity. However, some communities accept buttons, especially when plainer fasteners are not available.

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They Are Required To Wear Certain Hem Lengths

Clothing rules can vary from community to community, but most Amish women's hems must conform to a certain length. The rule is that the hem is no higher than the calf, as they don't show displays of beauty or adornment in a dress. 

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The body needs to be covered, and members that don't follow the rule may be chastised. Their dresses are always covered with either black or white aprons as well.

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Amish Do Not Play Any Musical Instruments

Amish often sing, but they do not play any musical instruments. There are a few exceptions, but the only musical instrument the Amish use is the human voice. The Amish believe playing instruments promotes self-expression and individuality.

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One exception is the harmonica, which is permitted on occasion. In addition, for Amish adults, dancing is forbidden as it is considered immodest. However, young people are permitted to dance and listen to music during Rumspringa.

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Shunning

The Amish can exclude members in two ways, the most common being shunning. Shunning is when members of the community limit contact with an individual to shame them back into the church. Shunning is one of the reasons Amish Christianity came about and is seen as critical in maintaining the integrity of the Amish church. 

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Shunning can be eating separately, not doing business with a person, not accepting gifts or rides from a shunned individual, or excluding a person from community activities.

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Barn-Raising

The Amish refer to barn-raising as a frolic, which is a term used for a social event with a practical purpose. The tradition was that when a new barn needed to be erected, hundreds of people attended the event, with the men performing the manual labor and the women providing the meals.

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The events were an overt symbol of community, one of the strongest pillars of the Amish religion. However, the Amish are drifting away from farming as a profession, and barn-raising is becoming increasingly less common.

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The Amish Have No Dietary Restrictions

Most outsiders wonder what the Amish eat, but they actually do not have dietary restrictions and are allowed to eat whatever they want. However, most Amish stick to a traditional Pennsylvania Dutch diet. 

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That diet consists of meat dishes such as pork chops, roast beef, ham, or meatloaf. Bread, cornmeal, and oatmeal are also staples of the Amish diet. Many have also seen Amish buggies going through the drive-thru line at Burger King.

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They Sing From The Oldest Continuously Used Christian Song Book

The Amish sing from the oldest continuously used Christian songbook called the Ausbund. The traditional Amish hymnal contains words but no music. The music of the songs is passed down from one generation to the next and can differ between communities. 

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The book was first printed in 1564 when the Anabaptists wrote the songs Amish churchgoers still sing today. The songs during an Amish church service can last as long as thirty minutes, and it is described as slow, drawn out, and "music for the soul rather than music for the ear."

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Where They Live

Farming is at the center of Amish lives, and with their population rapidly expanding due to large families, they are always seeking out new land. They look for land away from urban areas. The Amish initially settled in Ohio but are now living in thirty states as well as Canada. The largest population resides in Ohio, followed by Pennsylvania and Indiana. Today, the Ohio Amish Country is an area where about forty thousand Amish people live and work.

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The Amish settlements in Pennsylvania include about thirty thousand Amish. Don Kraybill stated, "The land is very expensive here. Good farming land will sell for $14,000 to $15,000 an acre. You need $2 million in up-front investment to start a new farm. Some Amish have moved from here to other states and remain affiliated with the Lancaster brand of Amish."

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The Amish Are One Of The Fastest-Growing Population Groups In America

The Amish community is one of the fastest-growing population groups in America. In 1920, their population was five thousand, and today their population is about three hundred thousand. The majority of that growth has occurred in the last three decades. 

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The rapid growth in population is due to a belief in large families, seen as a blessing from God. Also, the large number of children also provide labor for their farming enterprises and help in the homes.

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Work And Military Service

Traditionally, all kinds of farming have been at the center of Amish work life. However, more Amish have become involved in business enterprises such as carpentry and sales of farm products. In addition, they also form construction crews to build houses and other buildings for the non-Amish. 

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"Today, only about 40 percent of Amish households get their primary income from farming. Many have sizeable businesses making high-quality furniture or manufacturing metal products and so on." ----- Don Kraybill. They are exempt from military service due to their belief in non-resistance. That applies to war but also law enforcement, politics, and legal actions.

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They're Obsessed With Slow-Pitch Softball

The Amish love sports and love to have fun. They are known to play a lot of basketball, volleyball, and softball. They are obsessed with slow-pitch softball, with some of the Amish teens being very athletic. 

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Summer weekends often consist of large softball tournaments that welcome teams from multiple states and include some teams with Amish teens on Rumspringa. However, it is usually children and youth who play sports because many see adult participation as immodest and sports are best reserved for children.

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They Have Their Own Language

The Amish actually have their own language, speaking a version of Dutch, closer to Swiss-German. The Amish are bilingual and speak what is called "lower German." The language has a very unique, rural-type accent, which matches how they speak English. 

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However, because of its isolation, the language has a very different pronunciation than current German and has been influenced by the English of surrounding populations.

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They Celebrate Old Christmas

The Amish celebrate Christmas, but they focus their biggest Christmas celebration on January 6th, which is Epiphany. It is the day the three wise men visited Jesus and honored him with gifts, and it occurs twelve days after Christmas. 

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It is where the song "The 12 Days of Christmas" originates and was the original Christmas holiday for centuries. On January 6th, you can expect huge family gatherings and enough food to fill many bellies. For many, it also means a lot of cinnamon rolls and indoor volleyball as well.

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They Pay Taxes

It is a misconception that Amish do not pay taxes, but they are actually taxed on their earnings. "They pay all the taxes, income, property, sales, estate, corporate, school, that other people do. In fact, many of them pay school taxes twice, for both public and private Amish schools." ----- Young Center. 

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However, they do not pay for or receive Social Security because they view it as a form of commercial insurance. They believe that members of the church should care for one another's physical and material needs. The Amish have also been exempted from worker's compensation in some states.

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Christopher Hopkins

Another popular makeover featured in Glamour magazine was done by Christopher Hopkins. He is a speaker, author, media personality, singer, and makeover artist. 

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He opened Christopher Hopkins Salon in 1990 and was the artist responsible for the looks of the on-air talent. In 1994, he renamed it Christopher Hopkins Image Center and has appeared on television shows on HGTV, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and the Today Show.

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Kelly, Grandma From Michigan, Gets A Makeover

Kelly, a grandma from Michigan, received a makeover from Hopkins. Unlike Sarah, Kelly is not Amish. She came from Iron Mountain in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and desperately wanted a makeover. 

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Hopkins accepted Kelly's request for a makeover, and he began some epic cosmetic applications that changed her appearance completely. He used his experience to intensify Kelly's natural features. He wanted to bring her inner beauty to the surface.

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One Thing She Wanted To Change Was Her Hair

The one thing Kelly really wanted was for Hopkins to change her hair because it had become very unruly. She showed the studio crew her hair and said, "Here we go. Hold your breath. My hair used to be pin-straight. But it's changed now from, you know, my age."

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Her hair was wavy and, indeed, fairly wild. Hopkins stated that Kelly's hair presented his biggest challenge, as her hair was very fragile and overly processed.

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Her Family's Reaction

Kelly's daughter and grandchildren were there to see her amazing transformation. Kelly asked her grandchildren if they recognized her, and they said no. 

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Her daughter said, "This is my mom, and it was so incredible to see her transform. Hopkins, you're so wonderful inside and out; thank you to you and your glam team!" Another commenter said that she looked great, and the best part was her confidence.

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Everything About Kelly's Hair is Different

Hopkins changed everything about Kelly's hair, from color and length to style. He took advantage of her natural curls and created a hairstyle that framed Kelly's face. He changed the color, turning it brown and putting in blonde highlights, adding volume. 

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He wanted to accentuate her features and offset her "pear-shaped" face by making it appear wider at temple level. She also was wearing subtle lipstick in contrast to her darker, attention-grabbing eye makeup.

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She Was So Happy That She Did A Little Ballet Performance

Kelly was so pleased with her transformation that she treated viewers to a little ballet performance at the end of the video. 

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Kelly stated, "I feel gorgeous. It's not pretty; it's freaking gorgeous! I'm glad we're going out for dinner tonight because I can be glamorous and fabulous." When she looked in the mirror, all she could say was, "Wow." Kelly was speechless.

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Kelly's Transformation

Kelly was happy for the studio and team to do whatever they liked for her makeover. The team began by changing both the style and color of her hair. Kelly wanted to look twenty years younger. Her makeup was kept light in order to draw attention to her eyes. 

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Hopkins' specialty is transforming men and women over the age of forty-five. Kelly was very pleased with her new look and gave Hopkins a hug, thanking him for making her feel confident again.

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